ASG's Security Solutions Blog

Great Conversation Button

Connect with ASG

Don't miss a conversation! Continue the Conversation by email.

Your email:

Current Articles | RSS Feed RSS Feed

An Open Letter to the Presidents of our Universities - Part II

  
  
  
  
Setracon

From Setracon's President, Jeffrey Slotnick

In the first half of my letter I posed some questions, some risks, and some possible approaches. In this I will try to delineate further the approaches that might be taken to secure your university.

Having a well-trained Crisis management team, well written policies and procedures, exceptional communication ability, and a collaborative environment can assist an institution in eliminating or mitigating most events. Crisis management has four objectives:

•    Reducing tension during the incident
•    Demonstrating corporate commitment and expertise
•    Controlling the flow and accuracy of information
•    Managing resources effectively

An Open Letter to the Presidents of our Universities - Part I

  
  
  
  
Setracon

From Setracon's President, Jeffrey Slotnick

Every day you are responsible for the welfare of the institution and its stakeholders. It must make you uncomfortable when you read reports of incidents like Penn State University and realize that there are many different risks that may ultimately end up at your door step that may dilute the value you have worked so hard to create.

Organizational Resilience: Getting Started & Moving Forward

  
  
  
  
OrgRes FinalSteps

This is the twelfth article in a series entitled: Data Management and Organizational Resilience. ASG is offering a series of blogs as well as a white paper that aggregates these blogs into one download, with the intent to make the case for data management and its correlation to the Organizational Resilience Management function.

As the CSO this can be easy enough if you start with thoroughly understanding core business concepts, embrace the concept of Organizational Resilience, and utilize tools like MS SharePoint to assist in collating and manipulating data.

How Do You Make Data Intelligent?

  
  
  
  
data center

This is the eleventh article in a series entitled: Data Management and Organizational Resilience. ASG is offering a series of blogs as well as a white paper that aggregates these blogs into one download, with the intent to make the case for data management and its correlation to the Organizational Resilience Management function.

 

The Value of Data Management Tools and a Proposed Solution

Understanding the cost of NOT being resilient leads the reader to an apparent conclusion, in order to understand the common operating picture we must have large amounts of information (data) which is easily understood, accessible, changeable, searchable, quantifiable, actionable, measureable, usable and recoverable. There is a suite of products from Microsoft that support all these attributes and more. Some you’ve been using for years like the Office Suite and Exchange Email.  Combined with SharePoint, these familiar tools become extremely powerful. SharePoint provides a secured, accessible, central collaboration platform for document management and business activities.  SharePoint can centralize enterprise data such as calendars, contacts, tasks and more. It provides data analysis and manipulation tools, enterprise search, all in a platform that can be easily modified and extended with new features as your business needs change.  SharePoint can deliver on a variety of clients from laptops to smart phones. There is an ever expanding variety of 3rd party custom features and utilizes other industry forms of communications like RSS feeds and social media connections.  

The Cost of Not Being Resilient

  
  
  
  
Cost

This is the tenth article in a series entitled: Data Management and Organizational Resilience. ASG is offering a series of blogs as well as a white paper that aggregates these blogs into one download, with the intent to make the case for data management and its correlation to the Organizational Resilience Management function.

The financial impact of events cannot be overstated.  Worldwide, the cost of natural disasters and terrorism exceed the gross domestic product of many countries.  When you consider the financial and global supply chain impacts of the recent tsunami in Japan, or the costs of terrorism since 2011, the financial impact of the conflict in Libya, or the cost of the recent riots in England you immediately get a sense of the real costs of not being resilient.

The CSO's Relationship to Organizational Resilience Management

  
  
  
  
MovetheWorld

This is the ninth article in a series entitled: Data Management and Organizational Resilience. ASG is offering a series of blogs as well as a white paper that aggregates these blogs into one download, with the intent to make the case for data management and its correlation to the Organizational Resilience Management function.

As we move forward it is important to consider Machiavelli: “There is nothing more difficult to take in hand, more perilous to conduct, or more uncertain in its success, than to take the lead in the introduction of a new order of things, because the innovator has for enemies all those who have done well under the old conditions, and lukewarm defenders in those who may do well under the new.”

Data Management & Organizational Resilience: The Result

  
  
  
  
Risk

This is the eighth article in a series entitled: Data Management and Organizational Resilience. ASG is offering a series of blogs as well as a white paper that aggregates these blogs into one download, with the intent to make the case for data management and its correlation to the Organizational Resilience Management function.

When we look overall at successfully surviving an event we have to consider several factors for evaluation.  These factors are the type and duration of the event, the organizations risk appetite, and the organizational level of preparedness.

Data Management & Organizational Resilience: Implementation

  
  
  
  
Communication

This is the seventh article in a series entitled: Data Management and Organizational Resilience. ASG is offering a series of blogs as well as a white paper that aggregates these blogs into one download, with the intent to make the case for data management and its correlation to the Organizational Resilience Management function.

 

Five Key Principles of Implementation

1. Engaged partnership means that leaders at all levels collaborate to develop shared response goals and align capabilities. This collaboration is designed to prevent any level from being overwhelmed in times of crisis.

Data Management & Organizational Resilience: Planning

  
  
  
  
DMOR Planning

This is the sixth article in a series entitled: Data Management and Organizational Resilience. ASG is offering a series of blogs as well as a white paper that aggregates these blogs into one download, with the intent to make the case for data management and its correlation to the Organizational Resilience function.

 

What do these plans include?

 

All Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery plans need to encompass how employees will communicate, where they will go and how they will keep doing their jobs. The details can vary greatly, depending on the size and scope of a company and the way it does business. For some businesses, issues such as supply chain logistics are most crucial and are the focus on the plan. For others, information technology may play a more pivotal role, and the BC/DR plan may have more of a focus on systems recovery.

Data Management & Organizational Resilience: Definition and Analysis

  
  
  
  
Definition & Analysis

This is the fifth article in a series entitled: Data Management and Organizational Resilience. ASG is offering a series of blogs as well as a white paper that aggregates these blogs into one download, with the intent to make the case for data management and its correlation to the Organizational Resilience Management function.

Scope
In defining the scope of the project we want to define the boundaries of the organization to be included as being the whole organization or one or more of its constituent parts, while establishing the requirements for management considering the organization's goals, mission (internal and external), obligations, and legal responsibilities.  Further, the enterprise will want to consider critical operational objectives, assets, functions, services, and products.  Additionally, we want to determine risk scenarios based on both potential internal and external events that could adversely affect the critical operations and functions of the organization within the context of their potential impact.

All Posts